NCPCF                                                       Vol. VII-Issue No. 560
NEWS DIGEST                                Friday, November 24, 2017

 
“There is no greater tyranny than that which is perpetrated under the shield of the law and in the name of justice.” ~Montesquieu
Ibrahim Mohammad
IN THIS ISSUE
Interview with Umaima Jafri about her husband Ibrahim’s detentionMan Named Mohammad Says He Was Kicked Off a Greyhound Bus at 3 a.m. Because of His Name

Mass. man convicted of plotting to kill for ISIS

Two Years After Historic Settlement Ending Indefinite Solitary Confinement in CA, CCR Details Ongoing Violations, Releases Report Showing Lasting Consequences of SHU Post-Release

A ‘Sea Of Black Masks’: Prosecutors Open Felony Trial Of Inauguration Protesters

Watchdog Report Finds Trump Travel Ban Caused Confusion, Violated Court Orders

Trump’s “Extreme-Vetting” Software Will Discriminate Against Immigrants “Under a Veneer of Objectivity,” Say Experts

With the Trump travel ban, Americans face an important choice

Is FBI’s new focus on “Black Identity Extremists” the new COINTELPRO?

_____________________________________________________________________

 

Portraits of Injustice/Voices of Victims of Repression

Youtube (11/21): Interview with Umaima Jafri about her husband Ibrahim’s detention [Video: 48 min. 7 sec.]
Heather Gray and Cliff Albright interviewed Umaima Jafri on November 20, 2017 on WRFG-Atlanta’s “Just Peace” program about the detention of Umaima’s husband Ibrahim Mohammad. He has been detained for 2 years without bond or trial.
 
Multimedia
Newsweek (11/21): Man Named Mohammad Says He Was Kicked Off a Greyhound Bus at 3 a.m. Because of His Name [1 min. 4 sec.,  30 sec.]
A Ph.D. candidate who was traveling on a Greyhound bus from Dallas to a conference in Kansas City, Missouri, this month says he was kicked off at 3 a.m. during a stop in Wichita, Kansas, because his name is Mohammad.

_____________________________________________________________________

News Digest
 


Pre-Crime Reports/Pre-emptive Prosecutions/Thought Crimes/Entrapment/Material Support

 
Boston Globe (10/18): Mass. man convicted of plotting to kill for ISIS
A federal jury Wednesday found David Daoud Wright guilty of plotting to kill Americans on behalf of the Islamic State, capping a terrorism conspiracy trial that pitted free speech rights against security interests. Wright, 28, faces a potential life sentence after he was convicted on all five of the charges against him: conspiring to support a terrorist organization; conspiring to commit acts of terrorism beyond national boundaries; conspiracy to commit obstruction of justice; and two counts of obstruction of justice. During her closing arguments Tuesday, Hedges accused prosecutors of exploiting “the fear that ISIS inspired,” and said that Wright had the right under the First Amendment to collect propaganda, no matter how disturbing, and disseminate it. In an unusual move, Wright took the stand in his own defense last week, describing himself as an overweight, unhappy man who pretended to be an ISIS combatant in a desperate bid for attention.


Prison Conditions and Abuse/CMUs

 

The Center for Constitutional Rights and co-counsel filed a motion to extend the terms of the settlement by one year, noting that substantial reforms are still needed and the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) continues to violate the constitutional rights of Ashker class members. The Ashker litigation followed coordinated hunger strikes undertaken by thousands of prisoners statewide. The 2015 settlement resulted in nearly 1,600 prisoners being released into general population, but hundreds of class members were transferred to Level IV prisons, where conditions are similar to the SHU, with many spending the same or more time isolated in their cells than when they were in SHU.

Civil Freedoms Under Threat
 

Huffington Post (11/20): A ‘Sea Of Black Masks’: Prosecutors Open Felony Trial Of Inauguration Protesters
234 people were arrested en masse during protests on Jan. 20, commonly referred to as the J20 protests. Among them were six defendents, the first group to go to trial, and their case could determine whether prosecutors continue pursuing felony rioting charges against the nearly 200 people who have trials spread out over the course of the next year. In a dramatic opening statement, Assistant U.S. Attorney Jennifer Kerkhoff repeatedly referred to a “sea of black masks” that roamed the city causing chaos, violence and destruction. Several attorneys for the six defendants, on the other hand, told the jury there was not evidence that their clients participated in any destruction. But they were indiscriminately treated by police, with defendants’ attorneys alleging that the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department ― which is facing a lawsuit for its tactics that day ― violated its own policies by “kettling” a large group of people. It’s much easier to treat everyone the same, call the protest a riot, and lock everyone up, rather than comply with the First Amendment, one lawyer argued.

 

Government Policies Under Scrutiny

NPR 11/21): Watchdog Report Finds Trump Travel Ban Caused Confusion, Violated Court Orders
The Department of Homeland Security leadership is withholding an internal watchdog’s report detailing the government’s messy rollout of President Trump’s travel ban, including the violation of two federal court orders. The executive order banning people from seven mostly Muslim nations from entering the U.S. was suddenly implemented on Jan. 27.

 

Editorials/Opinions
 

The Intercept (11/16): Trump’s “Extreme-Vetting” Software Will Discriminate Against Immigrants “Under a Veneer of Objectivity,” Say Experts
This past August, technology firms lined up to find out how they could help build a computerized reality of President Donald Trump’s vague, hateful vision of “extreme vetting” for immigrants. At a Department of Homeland Security event, and via related DHS documents, both first reported by The Intercept, companies like IBM, Booz Allen Hamilton, and Red Hat learned what sort of software the government needed to support its “Extreme Vetting Initiative.” Today, a coalition of more than 100 civil rights and technology groups, as well as prominent individuals in those fields, has formed to say that it is technically impossible to build software that meets DHS’s vetting requirements — and that code that attempts to do so will end up promoting discrimination and undermining civil liberties.

Atlanta Magazine (11/21): With the Trump travel ban, Americans face an important choice
Do we stand up for our highest values, treating others with dignity, fairness, and respect? Or do we succumb to bigotry and fear, allowing ourselves to be divided on the basis of faith or nation of origin?


The Philadelphia Tribune (11/21): Is FBI’s new focus on “Black Identity Extremists” the new COINTELPRO?

If you’ve been to a Black Lives Matter rally or tweeted the related hashtag recently, then the FBI might consider you a “Black Identity Extremist,” at least according to a report published by one of the nation’s top law enforcement agencies. These unsubstantiated conclusions are troubling, especially in the context of the FBI’s history of targeting African-American activists and leaders, including Martin Luther King Jr., and members of the Congressional Black Caucus. But what is more troubling is the FBI’s creation of the term “Black Identity Extremist” and the definition of it.

_____________________________________________________________________
 

0 Comments

You can be the first one to leave a comment.

Leave a Comment