Civil Freedoms Under Threat

  • System ‘can shoot fleas off a dog’

    Source: Atlanta Journal Constitution. System ‘can shoot fleas off a dog’ by Arielle Kass.
    ACLU senior policy analyst Jay Stanley, while concurring that minorities are disproportionately targeted through video systems, said the extent to which surveillance can be used invades everyone’s freedoms

     
  • NSA, AT&T Warrantless Wiretapping Case Set for Court

    Source: PC World. NSA, AT&T Warrantless Wiretapping Case Set for Court by John P. Mello Jr.
    Two cases involving widespread warrantless wiretapping of U.S. citizens by the National Security Agency will face a major hurdle Wednesday in a federal appeals court in Seattle. A procedural hearing will be held to determine whether actions by the NSA and AT&T, which cooperated with the agency, can be challenged in court.

     
  • 10 Ways the Government Watches You

    Source: Security News Daily. 10 Ways the Government Watches You by Sue Marquette Poremba.
    President Barack Obama and Congress extended several key provisions in the Patriot Act until 2015. While some in Congress want to overturn the provisions or require the government to be more honest about how it spies on its citizens, chances are we will remain under the watchful and secretive eye of federal agencies for the foreseeable future. State and local governments also have surveillance measures in place. Many products that make life a little easier, such using an E-Z Pass card to zip through toll booths, feed information back to the government. Here are 10 ways government agencies watch us.

     
  • BART officials craft policy for cutting cellphone service

    Source: Los Angeles Times. BART officials craft policy for cutting cellphone service by Maria Laganga.
    A policy being developed by Bay Area transit officials would allow BART to cut cellphone service in its stations only under extreme circumstances.

     
  • The FBI vs. Antiwar.com

    Source: OP-Ed News.com. The FBI vs. Antiwar.com by Justin Raimondo.
    The “action” recommendations contained in the memo. While directing the Washington FBI’s Electronic Communication Analysis Unit (ECAU) to “further monitor the postings of website http://www.antiwar.com,” the San Francisco office — where both Eric and I lived at the time — is tasked with the following:”It is recommended that a PI be opened to determine if [redacted] are engaging in, or have engaged in, activities which constitute a threat to National Security on behalf of a foreign power.” Reading that, I could hardly believe my eyes.

     
  • How a Radical Leftist Became the FBI’s BFF

    Source: Mother Jones. How a Radical Leftist Became the FBI’s BFF by Josh Harkinson.
    To many on the left, Brandon Darby was a hero. To federal agents consumed with busting anarchist terror cells, he was the perfect snitch.

     
  • Locked Up Abroad—for the FBI

    Source: Mother Jones. Locked Up Abroad—for the FBI by Nick Baumann.
    Inside the feds’ secret program to have American citizens detained and interrogated by foreign governments.

     
  • Mass. rights groups seek info on police monitoring

    Source: Associated Press. Mass. rights groups seek info on police monitoring.

    Civil rights groups (ACLU and NLG) want to know more about the Boston police Department’s
    surveillance of political activists and protests and what it does with the collected information.

     
  • With Hair Pat-Downs, Complaints of Racial Bias

    Source: New York Times. With Hair Pat-Downs, Complaints of Racial Bias by JOE SHARKEY.
    The T.S.A. talks about a “multilevel” approach to security that adds better intelligence work, behavioral detection and more common sense to the checkpoint procedures, some of which have been derided as unnecessary “security theater.”

     
  • DHS says Terror Watchlist is exempt from Privacy Act

    Source: The Informant. DHS says Terror Watchlist is exempt from Privacy Act by Ali Winston.
    The federal government’s new anti-terror database, the Terror Screening Watchlist Service, went live. The database is loaded with an unknown amount of personal information, including names, photographs and biometric data. In a new turn that has civil liberties advocates crying foul, the Department of Homeland Security is claiming all information contained in the watchlist is confidential.